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  THE 8 RULES OF CLEANING & SANITIZING  
  Tips for Bottling your Beer  
  Now it’s bottling time. If this your first time bottling, take a minute to examine the bottle capper. Most cappers are referred to as a “winger” bottle capper. This is a double lever capper, hence the name “winger”. This capper will only work on standard beer bottles. It is quite simple to use. You simply take a cap and put it up in the bell. There is a magnet in the bell to hold the cap in place. Now just set the capper on the top of the bottle and pull the levers down. You will feel the cap crimp on the top of the bottle. There is no need to apply too much force. It is probably a good idea to practice on a few bottles before you get started with your bottling. “Beer Emergencies” can add thrill to the hobby, but they can sometimes take the fun out of it, too.  
  You will need approximately 54 12-ounce bottles for a five gallon batch. Make sure these bottles are clean. You should be able to look up into the bottles and see no solids. If you have an automatic dishwasher, load the bottles on the bottom rack, add 1 capful of household chlorine bleach to the dishwasher and run it on its hottest cycle with heated drying. Do not use SOAP or any RINSE agents. If you don’t have a dishwasher, you will have to soak your bottles in iodophor solution or any other no rinse santizer.  
  Also make sure the area where you do your bottling is clean and free of things like dirty dishes, open trash, or old, left out food. Even though your beer is fermented out, it still has some residual sugars in it such as caramelized malts and is vulnerable to the wort spoilers. It is extremely important that everything that comes in contact with the beer from this time on is sanitized. Fill your bottling bucket with cold water and add 1/2 ounce of iodophor. Put the racking cane and siphon hose in the bucket as well. Put the bottle filler in the solution, holding the spring valve open to allow it to fill with the solution.  
  Once you have everything soaking in iodophor, gently lift your fermentation bucket onto a counter top. Now you will need to prepare your priming sugar. This kit comes with 5 oz of dextrose (corn sugar). Put this into a one-cup measuring cup. In the same measuring cup add water to cover the dextrose. Microwave the mixture for 2 minutes or until the mixture is clear and you see some steam rising from it. If you do not have a microwave, you can do this on your stove top. Dump the iodophor solution out of your bottling bucket, saving some for use on things like your bottle caps. Pour the dextrose mixture into the bottling bucket. Remove the lid from your fermentation bucket. Now assemble your racking cane and siphon hose. Start your siphon into your bottling bucket on top of the dextrose mixture. As you siphon into the bottling bucket, set your hose off to one side of the bucket so that a gentle swirling action is created. This will allow your dextrose mixture to mix in with the beer evenly.  
  After you have transferred your beer to the bottling bucket, the dishwasher should be finished. Move your bottling bucket to the counter top. Gently stir with a sanitized spoon. Pull the bottles out of the dishwasher while still warm and begin filling. Remember to fill to the very top of the bottle. When you pull the filler out of the bottle, the displacement of the filler will leave the proper amount of head space to cap your beer. Have your caps close by and in an Iodophor solution. This way you are sanitizing those fingers every time you reach for a cap. It is extremely important that everything that comes into contact with the beer from this time on is sanitized. I can’t stress this enough! Iodophor used in the right strength will become your best friend in the hobby of natural fermentation.  
  Store the bottles at room temperature for 7-10 days, then chill bottles as needed and enjoy!  
 
***Special Note*** This chart is design for aproximate count. It is for use in inventoring bottles to see what is needed for you batch of beer. You may end up needing more or less each batch. This chart has worked well for both myself and others.
 
     
  Bottle US fl. oz.

1 Gallon 128 oz.

2 Gallons 256 oz. 3 Gallons 384 oz. 4 Gallons 512 oz 5 Gallons 640 oz. 6 Gallons 768 oz. 7 Gallons 896 oz
  187 ml. 6 Fl. Oz.Aprox
21
42
64
85
106
128
149
  375 ml. 11 Fl. Oz Aprox.
11
22
34
45
56
69
79
  500 ml. 16.5 Fl. Oz.
8
15
23
31
38
46
54
  650 ml 22 Fl. Oz.
5
11
17
23
29
35
40
  750 ml 25 Fl. Oz.Aprox
5
10
15
20
26
31
36
  1 Ltr. 33 Fl. Oz.Aprox
3.5
7
11
15
18
22
26
 
12 Oz
12 Fl. Oz.
10
21
32
42
53
64
74
  U.S. Pint 16 Fl. Oz.
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
  Imp Pint 19 Fl. Oz.
6
13
19
26
33
40
46
     
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